Friday, February 4, 2011

International Homebrew Project Recipe

So here it is, the recipe for the International Homebrew Project 2011. A quick recap, those that took part in the polls voted to brew a historical recreation of a milk stout, hopped with Challenger and Goldings. Therein lay one of our first hurdles, Challenger is a relatively modern hop, and so with the agreement of the majority of people who have told me they plan to brew for the project, we shifted to a combination of Fuggles and Goldings.

In thinking about the ingredients for the project, I have decided to push the brewing weekend back to the first weekend in March - so people can make arrangements for getting amber and brown malt, not to mention the invert #3 sugar. If you can't get amber and brown malt where you live, then here is a very useful article about making your own. On the making invert sugar syrup, as I plan to do, this post from Northern Brewer is useful. From my understanding, the #3 version was reasonably dark, so simmer it for about 90 minutes.

The recipe itself, kindly provided by Kristen England, is a recreation of a 1933 Barclay Perkins Milk Stout. So, as Ron would say, over to Kristen, though note I have changed his tables into bulleted lists, personal preference, that's all (and nothing to do with my shoddy HTML skills, honest guv).....

Milkstouts show up here and there throughout English beer history to the current day. There we never massively popular on a grand scale but always had their almost cult following. The most well-known is Mackesons XXX stout which currently has very little lactose in it. Most of the milk/sweet stouts are now made in happy, warm and tropical places. Jamaica, Trinidad, Malta, etc, etc. This ‘whopper’ of a stout is actually very low in gravity. It has pretty much every dark, toasty and delicious malt and sugar. Then you throw in two separate dose of lactose, one in the copper, one after for a grand total of about 22% lactose. The beer is very dark and roasty. The bitterness is quite high as these stouts weren't known to be exceedingly bitter. Lactards beware!
  • OG - 1.053
  • FG - 1.029
  • ABV - 4.4%
  • IBU - 39.1
  • SRM - 105
  • EBC - 207.8
  • Apparent Attenuation - 45.12%
  • Real Attenuation - 39.96%
The recipe is listed first in pounds, then kilograms and finally as a percentage, based on 5 US Gallons, or 19 litres.
  • Eng. 2 Row - 5.29/2.41/40.7
  • Amber malt - 1.04/0.48/10.6
  • Brown Malt - 0.58/0.26/5.9
  • Crystal 75 - 0.58/0.26/5.9
  • Invert # 3 - 0.5/0.23/5.1
  • Roasted Barley - 0.84/0.38/8.5
  • Lactose in boil - 1.26/0.57/12.8
  • Lactose priming - 1.04/0.47/10.6
For the extract brewers amongst us use 4lbs or 1.82kg for 5 US gallons or 19 litres respectively.

The mash is 90 minutes at 151°F or 66°C, with a water to grain ratio of 0.92qt/lb or 1.92l/kg.

Expect a long brewday for this, given that the boil is 2.5 hours. Talking about the boil, here's the hopping schedule, by ounces then grammes respectively.
  • Fuggle 5.5% @ 150mins 1.15/32.5
  • Goldings 4.5% @ 90mins 0.7/19.8
The yeast recommended for this recipe is Nottingham, or Wyeasts 1318 London Ale III.

Grist & such

The base malt for this beer is the toast mild malt. If you can’t get it, some Optic would be nice or even Maris otter. ***For the extract brewers out there the only real change is that you’ll use pale malt syrup instead and the poundage is listed and highlighted above. The amber and brown malt add a good dose of complexity and flavor but don’t dominate the palate like the 8.5% of roasted barley.

Hops

The hop additions for this beer are mostly for bittering. The neat thing about this beer is that milk stouts at a later time are much less bitter than this one. Nearly 40 bus is quite a bit! One addition at the start of the boil and then another addition an hour later. If you wanted to dry hop this beer you can do a simple combination of fuggles and goldings but I wouldn’t go higher than about 1g/L. Any more you really are going to have a striking hop nose.

Mash & Boil

The techniques used in this recipe are very straightforward. There was a simple multi-infusion mash where additions of hot liquor were added to keep the mash at the wanted temperature. You dough in a bit thick and then have a good sparge. This mash is very simple as there are a lot of things easy to extract out of here. The No3 invert sugar should definitely be added but can be substituted by using a mix of treacle and golden syrup. White sugar and blackstrap can be used in a pinch at about a 10:1 ratio. The lactose is the big boy here and there are two separate additions. The first one goes in during the boil and the second goes in at priming which we’ll cover later. Both invert #3 and the first lactose addition goes in at 30 minutes.

Fermentation, Conditioning & Serving

A simple fermentation at 68F (20C) will do good to ensure a nice and fruity beer that finishes well. This beer was meant to be bottle conditioned but you can serve it out of a keg. The second dose of lactose goes in with the priming sugars. NOTE – lactose is NOT the priming sugar. The lactose and priming sugars can be boiled in a little water together and added at once. Shoot for around 2.0 volumes of CO2 if you can. The more ‘fizzy’ the less mellow it will be. For serving, I suggest you keep this thing out of any sort of refrigeration. Cellar temp is ok but this really does best at room temperature or warmer.

14 comments:

  1. Looking good... one comment: the ingredient list has invert no #2, not no #3 as the comments suggst.

    For more info on making inverts, including specific color destinations go here

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  2. My mistake, corrected it. Thanks for pointing that out.

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  3. whoa! 2.5 hour boil...

    Very nice detailed recipe. I look forward to brewing this.

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  4. I was not able to fit this into my schedule, but look to make it in the future. The recipe just sounds delicious

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  5. That's a blog I wrote for Northern Brewer. That was my first go at it based on advice I'd gotten from Kristen England. I've done it a few times since then with Sugar in the Raw and I think it adds something nice to beer. That blog roughneck linked to has even more specific info to make the dark stuff.

    I was a little skeptical on brewing this style at first, but that recipe looks absolutely amazing. 45% attenuation here we come!

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  6. Flagon - most of the info in my link came from Kristen as well. I added a few details from either Ron's blog or other web sources (old ragus for color, etc). I agree that demerera sugar adds something extra to it.

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  7. 12% Amber is very high! Though I have about 800g laying about I think. Shall give it a go though :)

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  8. 2.5 hour boil? Jaysus a long day indeed.

    That is a lot of lactose and I don't do well with it. I think it's just milk because cheese and Yogurt are fine so I will go for it. If I can't drink the keg I am sure someone will help me out.

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  9. One small point. Milk Stout was incredibly popular for a while. In the 1950's about 50% of Whitbread's output was Mackeson.

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  10. Ron,

    Thanks for the correction. I love all the 50's adds for Mackeson's.

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  11. Guys,

    Re invert sugar. I had my buddy update his brewing page with info I wrote about making invert sugar. Nic did a good job of breaking down how to make invert from scratch. Then I have a simple blending outline to make it from sugar or golden syrup and blackstrap molasses.

    here you go:
    http://www.unholymess.com/blog/beer-brewing-info/making-brewers-invert

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  12. Just placed an ingredient order with Northern Brewer! Aside from getting crystal 80 instead of 75, I was able to find all the malts for this recipe, including the mild malt.

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  13. Just placed my ingredient order minus the lactose which I am hoping to get from a friend who got it by mistake.
    I am using Crystal 60 and Optic as my base malt.

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